Leaf vs Hire Car – Gen 2 Leaf Facebook Group

48 – EV20Q Podcast News

Since my last road trip with my Nissan Leaf I visited Ireland. I had to hire a car in Ireland and unfortunately, it was a petrol car. It sounded and felt really agricultural compared to driving my beautiful electric car. As we were leaving from Barcelona airport it was necessary to drive from home to the parking space where we left Rosie for the four days we were away. It was an easy drive down and on the way there was time to pull into the AMB Electric vehicle charger near to the airport. It didn’t take long to get the battery up to just over 75% so when I arrived back in the country I wouldn’t need to go looking for a charger to make sure I had enough energy for getting home.


I have in the past I’ve driven from home to Barcelona airport and back again with one full charge of the battery. That was in the summer time and I think the range in winter is just a little bit less. It made sense to add some electron juice to make sure. I didn’t want to fill the battery to 100% because it doesn’t do the battery any good to leave it full over a number of days. It’s better to keep it under 80% to make sure no damage is done to the battery. It probably would have been okay, but it’s best not to take any chances anyway.

Weird Fossil Car


It was so weird to drive a hire car, especially one without cruise control. You can get used to having cruise control that’s intelligent with the radar to keep your distance from the car in front. Pro Pilot Assist is a marvellous safety feature well worth having. I don’t rely on it for the steering, but I do allow it to assist me to steer the car.


In the hire car I had to get used to changing the manual gears. I had to use a switch to manually turn on the headlights and another switch in order to dip the headlights. I even had to reach up to manually dip the rear view mirror. After all these months of having a technologically advanced car going to drive a hire car is like driving like an animal.


I also missed my comfortable seats I have in my 2018 Nissan Leaf Tekna. I’m glad I paid extra to get the top of the range with the good seats and the heating included.

Deer Park Forest – Virginia, Ireland

Yearning for a Big Trip


I can see that one of these days I will have to drive my car up through France, maybe go across the UK and once again take the ferry crossing to Ireland. I’d love to do one of these really long road trips and really drive my electric car to the limit. I feel comfortable with having enough electric charge points I can connect to all the way through France. I would have to do some research and checking on what I would need in terms of RFID cards and apps for driving through England and Wales. It would take a lot longer than flying and I’m not sure I’d persuade my wife to take the trip because she doesn’t like going on boats. It would also be weird driving my left-hand drive car on the wrong side of the road in the UK and Ireland.

Gen 2 Nissan Leaf owners on Facebook

This group has grown to over 1500 members. Many of the members are actual owners of the Gen 2 Nissan Leaf. It’s a good group to be in to share knowledge about our favourite electric car. Sometimes the questions are about the general workings of the car. People who have just bought the Leaf or about to buy the car and are wondering about a functional feature of the Nissan Leaf. We have members in the group who have had the car for a long time and done a lot of miles or kilometres in their vehicle. So there is a lot of experience and knowledge available. It’s also a good place for us to share photos of our cars. Spreading a bit of the Leaf love.


There are times when we have problems with the vehicle. Like that time I had a problem with my radar sensor at the front of the car. I was able to see if other people had experienced the same problem and what they did to be able to get things sorted out. By the way, my Pro Pilot Assist and Intelligent Cruise Control has been working perfectly since I got the radar sensor changed.

Rubbish Leaf Connect App


All of the group know that the application you get from Nissan to connect to you car is a bit rubbish. It takes a huge amount of time to connect to the car via the server at Nissan. I can understand it is necessary to go via a server at Nissan for digital security. I just wish it was not quite so glacier slow. I have been looking at another application called Leafy. This works a little bit quicker and I’m able to see if the car is connected to the charger. I can tell it to start charging from the app. I can also send commands to the air conditioning in case I want to preheat or pre-cool the car. For the moment I think I will stick with the Leafy app and not bother with the app from Nissan. Even though the app from Nissan has just been updated. In fact, it seems as if the app is working worse than previously.

Braking and Regen


One of the members of the group, Peter Haas is asking about the E pedal. “Anyone else notice ePedal regen going to full when you let off the accelerator, then quickly dropping to no regeneration, regardless of speed. Braking continues, but not as strong as I have grown used to. Looking at the powermeter the regen stops so I assume the car is applying the friction brake. What’s going on?


This isn’t a problem I’ve come across myself with my Nissan Leaf. Other users have asked for more information such as the level of the battery. If the battery is at 100% then obviously you’re not going to get any regen because there’s nowhere for the generated electricity to go to.


It could just be there is some sort of actual problem and Peter needs to take the car to the dealership and get it checked out properly. Another possibility would be to look into the Leaf Spy Pro and see if there are any error codes. As far as I can make out it seems that some of these error codes are a little bit cryptic and you need to get the garage to properly look at the car anyway.


Jennifer says that her car occasionally goes into fiction breaking without regen. She says if she gives a blip on the pedal it restarts to regen. It seems what this does is to stop the breaking briefly and then when the car starts to brake again it works with the regen rather than using the friction brakes.
David thinks its unusual behaviour and he says you need to be aware the power meter has a different scale between B mode and E-pedal. What may look like less regen on the meter, it actually isn’t.


Another hypothesis, this time from Patrick is that if you go down a steep hill, the friction brakes seem to take over. Also if the road is rough the car is more likely to use the friction brakes. I have driven down some steep hills and even some of them had rough surfaces and I haven’t noticed anything myself. Benedict says the reason it’ll go to friction brakes is because they work on all four wheels. If you’re only using regen then you’re only getting the braking action happening on the front wheels. It’s because of safety reasons regen is minimised and the friction brakes are used to give you the braking power you’re looking for.
Another owner-driver of the 2018 Nissan Leaf, Mario says he’s not using ePedal any more. He didn’t say why he has stopped using it, but it seems a shame not to use the ePedal. I always have ePedal switched on and the only time I’m not using it is when I’m using Pro Pilot Assist.

Knowledgeable Group of People


As you can see the drivers of the 2018 Nissan Leaf like to go into deep detail of inner workings of the car. For the most part I just drive it and enjoy it. I don’t fiddle about with it too much because I have not found myself in need of extra braking while wanting to slow down. So it’s working for me and as they say – “if it isn’t broke then don’t fix it.”

At the shopping centre again charging the car

I went again to the shopping centre where last time I was hassled by the security. This time I didn’t look quite so dodgy and didn’t get pulled over. I plugged into one of the two charging stations. On each station there is a Type 2 connector and also a Shuko connector. In the car I have both the granny charging cable and also my Type 2 cable. With the granny charging cable you’re only going to get about 3 kW charging speed. With the Type 2 the maximum is going to be around 6.6 kW. I suppose it’s handy to have the two charging sockets available even if the amount of power isn’t enhanced using the Type II charging point. It’s possible you only have the one cable with you so there being a choice of sockets is a good thing. The other charging variable is how much power the charging station will let you have. I checked with the Leaf Spy Pro app and saw I was getting less than 3 kW. The charging post is limited by the maximum amps available. It’s probably only got a 16 amp breaker compared to the 32 amp breaker I have with my EVSE at home. This is not really a problem when it comes to using a destination charger. Especially if the electric is free. I was able to plug in and use the Barcelona live card to activate the charging point. I stayed at the charger for more than two hours – It was a long shopping trip. It would have been much shorter if I was on my own. When we got back to the car the battery was at 100%. Excellent! I call that a result.

3 Replies to “Leaf vs Hire Car – Gen 2 Leaf Facebook Group”

  1. Hello, can you tell me what is a Shuko connector please? Haven’t seen that word before. Thanks.

    Reply

    1. It is the plug socket we use in Europe for normal 240 volt electric appliances.

      Reply

  2. […] called Sant Pol de Mar and is not too far away from where Greg lives, the guy with the black 2018 Nissan Leaf. In the town there were three charging points to choose from and I went to all of them. The first […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.